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Search Results 50 to 99 of about 123 (some duplicates have been removed)
FOX News
Jul 24, 2011 7:00am PDT
a new news agency called the american world service. this on top of npr and pbs. good idea? liz is an author of journalist and fox news contributor who joins us every sunday at this time with a commentary. good morning liz. >> good morning, eric. this is about bowl jerry running amuck again. lee bollinger, the drastic call leftist academic who heads columbia university who was the same man who in 2007 i brought you invitation and the person of mahmoud ahmadinejad, the president of iran. and, of course, known to everybody as a great hater of jews. so he invites him to columbia university, which caused an uproar, high jewish population of students at columbia university but, nevertheless, he was getting press sod bowl jerry proceeded and then once he got him there he insulted him which even made better copy for him. so bollinger is not shy about seeking publicity. now, his latest try is about getting a sort of b.b.c. for american. a totally government-funded news service for america. bad idea. he says it's a good idea. let me give you an example. he wrote about this in the columbia j
Comedy Central
Jul 12, 2011 1:30pm PDT
", listen to progressive talk radio cash did -- i guess nobody does, you listen npr and you find all the facts that fit that and everybody has the data. so who is right. and so the only way to tell really the difference between these true patterns and false patterns is science. >> stephen: really? >> really. >> stephen: you think science is the answer. >> yeah, i'm not joke being that. >> stephen: you're not jock being science but isn't that just your belief? are you a skeptic, you are inclined to believe that skepticism, the scientific method is the right idea but that is so that you look for evidence out there in the world that evidence is a good thing to look for and you -- it is the periodic table element. >> so i can -- but isn't science is just another belief system. >> it is another belief system but it sets apart from all the other belief systems because it has built into it self-correcting machinery that says if you don't look for your disconfirming evidence that debunks your own belief, somebody else will, usually with great plea in a published form. >> what is debunking, what
CSPAN
Jul 17, 2011 10:00am EDT
rovner from npr to talk about the president's implementation of the health- care bill. that is tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern here on c-span and c-span radio. thank you for joining us. i hope you enjoy the rest of your weekend and have a great week ahead. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] >> as far as how states are viewing debt discussions in washington, what concerns among chief executives like yourself? >> the concerns are two-fold. the biggest concern and the more inaction we have been out of washington, d.c., the more upset this causes in our own economies and state. consumer confidence and business confidence is affecting my economy. you can imagine my consumer confidence is down. i'm not getting revenues and it is affecting the coffers of state government. a number of those in the business community have money but have not been willing to hire simply because of the uncertainty of what is going on in washington, d.c. that really has a direct impact but not just my state. with all the individuals
ABC
Jul 11, 2011 4:00am PDT
has named a plane after him. pretty impressive. does he have to pay the baggage fees? >> he told npr he used to be so scared of flying he couldn't get on a plane, now he can't get off a plane. >> that is incredible. talk about getting over it by just getting on the plane. >>> now, next on this monday -- a boy falls 40 feet down a well and his dad springs into action. >> it ends all well. >>> plus, is it one of the greatest soccer matches ever? a huge comeback for team usa. >> fantastic match. >>> and what a cleaning crew found onboard a plane shocked even the tsa. we'll explain coming up. a plane shocked even the tsa. we'll explain coming up. [ male announcer ] it's simple physics... a body y rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and inflammation. plus, in
ABC
Jul 15, 2011 4:00am PDT
that is sending hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars down the drain. thanks to npr we know about loads of unused spare change piling up as the nation stares down its debt. abc's jon karl explains. >> reporter: we took a journey to the u.s. mint in philadelphia for a lesson in how the government is losing money by making money. this is the presidential dollar coin. congress ordered the mint to make millions of them to honor every dead president but nobody seems to want them. they cost 32 cents a pop to make. the mint makes nearly 2 million of them every day. do the math. about 600,000 dollars a day to make them. because almost nobody uses these things, most go directly into storage. we found a bunch of them 100 miles down the road in a vault. here at the federal reserve in baltimore, the coins are packed into plastic bags stacked one on top of each other all the way up and down this aisle several aisles of them, millions and millions of dollars in presidential coins. federal reserve says they are piling up so quickly they are spending $650,000 to build a new vault in dallas to hol
CSPAN
Jul 18, 2011 7:00am EDT
getting $400 million from the american government. i think npr can function just fine on its own. that would be nearly $1 billion a year, $10 billion over a decade, if we just cut out those two programs. there many places we could cut that we're spending on programs that we do not need, wasteful programs. when the gao cn find $200 billion in cuts, that a significant. host: in your view, what is the proper role of government? guest: xiii, the government is ordained by god. punish those who do evil and reward those which is right. the government should be maintaining law and order and to be fostering a society in which exemplary behavior is rewarded and less than exemplary behavior is not. and there's a moral symmetry to the society. i think government and the country as wealthy as ours, we should be looking out for the welfare and health of the people within the ability of the government and the ability of the country to pay we cannot do everything. that is part of the problem. washington has been tried to do everything. they have been kicking the can down the road. now we've reac
PBS
Jul 12, 2011 10:00pm PDT
happened to rupert murdock media empire especially the potential deal. we are covering all of this for npr and he joins us from london, david, welcome. rupert murdock is in britain, who wants to talk to him and what about? >> there's a parliamentary committee hat has requested his presence, the presence of his son james murdock who is the top news corp. executive here in the united kingdom. and rebecca brook she's the chief executive over the news corporate newspapers here in the uk and she was editor and chief at the time of some of the most egregious alleged incident. >> do they have the power of a subpoena? >> there's some question about that. news international, the newspaper division has put out a statement saying that both mr. murdock, james murdock and ms. brooks will cooperate. but they didn't say necessarily that they'll testify so there's some question as to what form that cooperation will take. >> what does news international have to say about the latest allegations concerning former prime minister gordon brown? >> well he made these very anguished charges that news corp. had es
PBS
Jul 1, 2011 5:30pm PDT
. >> lehrer: we get the latest on new clashes in syria from npr's deborah amos in damascus. >> the president wants to have a national dialogue, he says on july 10th. this group says nada, we are not your partners until the violence stops on the streets. >> brown: paul solman talks to the authors of a provocative new book on how fannie mae's push- for-profits helped pump up the housing bubble. >> if you are trying to enrich yourself, increase your profits, which fannie mae was absolutely determined to do then that becomes a per version of home ownership. >> lehrer: mark shields and michael gerson analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our future depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it's all about investing in the future. >> we can find new energy-- more cleaner, safer and smarter. >> collaborating with the best in the field. >> chevron works with the smartest people at leading universities and tech companies. >> an
PBS
Jul 19, 2011 5:30pm PDT
of npr. >> brown: then, we ask nuclear regulatory commission chair gregory jaczko if u.s. reactors could withstand an earthquake like the one that devastated japan. >> ifill: from indonesia, ray suarez reports on the challenges and the troubles facing one of the world's largest democracies. >> it made tremendous strides politically and economically but still struggles with corruption. >> brown: kwame holman updates the budget battles as the house and senate offer dueling plans for reducing the deficit. >> ifill: and judy woodruff explores the deadline-driven deal cutting underway with political editor david chalian. >> brown: plus, in a season of tornadoes, floods and more, we get some poetic perspective on the beauty and power of nature. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's got to work on a big scale. and i thi
CSPAN
Jul 31, 2011 1:00pm EDT
went into radio instead of television, and she became an npr reporter, and her beat was covering this dispute that scooter libby/jude at this time miller thing. and i remember hearing one of her reports on the radio, i think it was after libby was convicted of perjury and the other fences, and she said that's what happened to louis libby. this is libby lewis reporting. [laughter] anyway, judy miller who had been subpoenaed by a grand jury that was investigating who the source of the leak of the identity of valerie plame was. valerie plame was an undercover cia agent, and her identity was leaked after her husband had debunked the administration's claim that saddam hussein was seeking nuclear material this africa. in africa. the court refused to hear the case in 2005 and left miller in jail. that was a big story because everybody had anticipated that the court would clarify and needed to clarify the extent to which reporters are able to protect their confidential sources. but in the miller case it was a disi ponte -- disappointing nondecision, just a refusal to take the case. the o
PBS
Jul 6, 2011 5:00am PDT
] >> if you're talking about them , i understand. >> not me. >> he wasn't talking about npr. >> ok. all public media. that's fine. but the idea is that you believe -- >> and that's a challenge. >> corporations are a good thing. they get people to accumulate wealth and then they risk it and they create jobs, which is what they want to do and they create strong communities. but, they should not be running our government. >> we don't elect corporations, we elect corporations. and the corporations want whatever they want, but ultimately it falls to the politicians to act in our interests or against our interests. but, i want to switch the conversation for the moment from the corporate side of this to the political side of this. you indict the entire system by saying that the politicians accept this money and then seek to dismantle the protections that we all deserve. is, is politics beyond fixing as far as that goes? >> well, there are two things that you need to do to fix the politiccl system. the most important thing is to fix the citizens united case. we lost democracy in this count
NBC
Jul 17, 2011 6:30pm EDT
npr, taxpayers haven't faired as well. is this program a waste of taxpayer money. >> the dollar coin program is a waste of taxpayer money. i think it's time to put a halt to this experiment. >> reporter: but ending it probably requires another law from congress. until then, the mint has five years and 20 presidents to go. lisa myers, nbc news, baltimore. >>> still ahead, the big showdown in washington over the debt limit. and the president's warned of potential catastrophe. so are lawmakers any closer to a deal? >>> and a sunday surprise for those dire predictions of carmageddon in california. i have copd. if you have it, you know how hard it can be to breathe and what that feels like. copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. spiriva helps control my copd symptoms... by keeping my airways open a full 24 hours. plus, it reduces copd flare-ups. spiriva is the only once-daily inhaled copd maintenance treatment that does both. and it's steroid-free. spiriva does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. tell your doctor if you have kidney problems, glaucoma, trouble ur
ABC
Jul 14, 2011 6:30pm EDT
theation is staring down so much debt. we first heard about this on npr, and had no idea it was going on. here's abc's jon karl. >> reporter: we took a journey to the heart of the u.s. mint in philadelphia. down long corridors, into oversized elevators and through doors, lots of doors, for a lesson on how to lose money while making money. it sounds a little like vegas around here, except the coins never stop coming. this is the presidential dollar coin. they're making them to honor every dead president, but nobody seems to want them. not even the one for rutherford b. hayes. rutherford b. hayes, hot off the press. literally, these coins are still warm. made of manganese brass, they coco 32 cents a pop to make. the mint can make 1.8 million a day. do the math. that's nearly $600,000 a day. because almost nobody uses these things, most go directly into storage. we found a bunch of them 100 miles down the road in a vault. here at the federal reserve in baltimore, the coins are packed into plastic bags stacked one on top of each other all the way up and down this aisle. several aisl
CSPAN
Jul 18, 2011 8:30am EDT
editor at npr. skip over our speaker for a moment, over the podium as well, melissa sharp with new silk media. she is our fantastic speakers committee chair. skip over our second speaker for a moment, the key to seem to press secretary with the natural resources defense council. also the organizer of today's event. we thank you for that, bob. we are told that it is a vote and we are awaiting another guest of the speaker, congressman brad miller of north carolina. then moving on down, andrea stone, correspondent for "huffington post." glow is washington director of reporters without borders and a vital member of our press freedom member and al isley is editor at large who tells me been blogging for "huffington post" since day one. now please a large amount of applause for everyone. [applause] >> if there were a king and queen of online journalism, our headline to a guest speakers could be considered candidates for members of the royal family. when tim armstrong and arianna huffington announced aol's purchase of "huffington post" in february it marked not just yet another reshaping of aol
NBC
Jul 30, 2011 12:35am EDT
to -- >> jimmy: listen to npr. >> i listen to the music. like i got headphones on, i listen to my music and i'm just kind of relaxed. >> jimmy: what songs are you going out to? do you have a favorite one? >> i listen to all -- all kinds, man. >> jimmy: maybe ben e. king. maybe a little "stand by me" would be a good one. you could to that -- a little ben e. king. [ singing ] ♪ when the night >> jimmy: yeah. ♪ has come and the land is dark ♪ [ laughter ] ♪ and the moon is the only light we'll see ♪ >> jimmy: oh, come on! right there! that's what i'm talking about. [ cheers and applause ] my man, that was good. that was great! [ applause ] now when -- i got say this. the chuck liddell fight -- i have to bring it up, because this is insane. you got advice from randy couture. >> yeah. before that fight, like i'm always like nervous pervous before my fights. like, like, i wouldn't fight if i didn't get nervous. but that fight i was really nervous cause it was my first time really like stepping up to fighting a big name like chuck liddell. >> jimmy: yeah. >> and like during the
MSNBC
Jul 21, 2011 6:00pm EDT
he said on npr himself today. >> we have to make tough decisions on things like defense spending el arizona well as domestic spending but we also have to have more revenues. with that acknowledgement that we need a balanced approach, that republican leaders on capitol hill are going to be willing to engage in the kind of compromise that can resolve this problem. >> mr. steele, a balanced approach, we've got to have some revenues. republicans have got to be willing to compromise. >> yeah. >> i mean, can your party get it together and understand that they cannot put it all on grandma's back? >> well, yes and they're not. and i think to dana's point, the interesting thing about what the clip you just played of the president, is that he wasn't necessarily talking about right now. remember, there is now washington has come to the conclusion that this is going to be a two-step process. the first is to get something done by august 2nd and the second piece will get into the real deep substance of what the longer term effort is going to be. i think this is a very interesting, you know, chall
CSPAN
Jul 18, 2011 12:00pm EDT
should be getting $400 million from the american government. i think npr can function ju fine on its own. that would be nearly $1 billion a year, $10 billion over a decade, if we just cut out those two programs. there many places we could cut that we're spending on programs that we do not need, wasteful programs. when the gao cn find $200 billion in cuts, that a significant. host:n your view, what is the proper role of government? guest: xiii, the government is ordained by god. punish those who do evil and reward those which is right. the government should be maintaining law and order and to be fostering a society in which exemplary behavior is rewarded and less than exemplary behavior is not. and there's a moral symmetry to the society. i think government and the country as wealthy as ours, we should be looking out for the welfare and health of the people within the ability of the government and the ability of the country to pay we cannot do everything. that is part of the problem. washington has been tried to do everything. they have been kicking the can down the road. now we've re
PBS
Jul 20, 2011 5:30pm PDT
afford. >> brown: julie r.o.v.er in of npr, thanks so much. >> you're welcome. >> ifill: now to the third in our series of reports from indonesia, where developing a male contraceptive is the new face of family planning. ray suarez reports. >> reporter: it doesn't look like much: six-feet tall, a leafy shrub growing amid the lush foliage of an indonesian forest. but a chemical locked in these leaves could become a useful tool for limiting population growth here in indonesia and potentially around the globe. to get to the plants, it's a one-hour hike or a white- knuckled motorcycle ride up a steep mountain path across two rickety wooden bridges. the plant is called gandarusa and its medicinal qualities have been known to people here for centuries. traditionally, it has been brewed into an herbal remedy for stress to calm the nerves. but for a long time, there had been talk of an unexpected side effect: reduced fertility. now researchers in surabaya, on the eastern edge of the island of ja, are drying the leaves, chopping them up, extracting the active chemical, and putting it in caps
CSPAN
Jul 31, 2011 12:40am EDT
more. npr may be. you filter your sources and surround yourself with people who are your fellow conservatives. libertarians or whatever we are borg you -- everything gets filtered through that. because we are so tribal we also feel good about this like we are right and they are wrong. not that we are right. we are morally right and we are better than them and everybody does this. including scientist. every scientist would love for his eerie to be true. it is how you advance your career and how you move up the academic ladder and you have made an important discovery. so of course, scientists are going to be usually subject to do the confirmation bias. i guess we will talk about bias in science. is a problem, but it is a bigger problem in all the other areas of life religion, politics, economics and social attitudes because it leaves science has a systematic way of getting out the truth and trying to avoid those kinds of cognitive biases. it is not perfect but if you don't look for your disconfirming evidence i can assure you somebody else will usually with great glee in a public
CSPAN
Jul 10, 2011 9:00pm EDT
" and we've done a book with david folken clothe flick who is an npr reporter with a collection of essays again taking this subject beyond the film's limitationlimitation. it can in a visceral way to get you the story but can only tell you so much. these essays in these books tell you more fully what's going on with media today, especially digital print, what the future might look like. >> and i know i said just two more but we've got one more to look at. and this is the unquiet american. rob, it's over on the wall there if you can get that. richard holbrooke. >> well, this is a book that we're very proud to be involved with. richard holbrooke's widow came to us, a bunch of people, and said, you know, we think you guys would be perfect to put together a book that really captur
FOX News
Jul 14, 2011 5:00pm EDT
and vets. how are we going to take care of them? no one is talking about green initiatives or npr. that is the only two things we care about are those things then cut everything else. that is the solution. >> bob: we just got a piece in here. to show how it's going to ignite. >> greg: you didn't hear a word i said. >> bob: i did. it was fine until the green thing. press secretary that dana used to hold that job and the current press secretary carney talking about an issue with a reporter and not in good spirit. >> in theory, would it also be that the meetings be held in other places? i suppose they could be. but if we felt like they should be we'd be there. ask me a question that makes sense and i can answer. >> eric: oooh. >> bob: have you gotten close to saying that? >> dana: i remember the feeling -- trying to think of who is he looking at there is a seating chart. i remember the feeling of immense frustration. jay carney used to be a reporter asked questions like that. if you are at the podium every day you can get frustrated and pop off at somebody. i remember i did it one ti
MSNBC
Jul 15, 2011 12:00pm EDT
told npr he's in favor of raising the debt ceiling in return for spending restraint. do but regret signing that pledge? >> the pledge in question is a pledge not to raise taxes. the problem in washington is they spend too much. and that needs to be the solution. we've got to attack the overspending. >> do you see repealing tax cuts the same as raising taxes? >> the house republican budget actually proposes to rid ourselves of quite a few loopholes and lower the rate and have a net no new revenue. but republicans aren't against new revenue. we do that by getting washington off the backs of job creators across america and get this economy going again. we have a problem. the economy is going the wrong way. send spending is going up. the president has to request a huge debt increase. >> that's all happening under the bush era tax cuts. you're arguing that those tax cuts are what sparked job creation, we know we've seen the highest unemployment rate in generation under those bush era tax cuts. we know that american corporations are sitting on a lot of cash. >> ma'am -- >> we know that t
Search Results 50 to 99 of about 123 (some duplicates have been removed)